The Structural Concrete Alliance would like to thank all those that joined us for our first Practical Demonstration Day of 2016. The day proved to be very useful and informative for all those that attended.

This one-day event was held at The Vinci Technology Centre, Leighton Buzzard on Wednesday 21st September 2016.

The Structural Concrete Alliance regional CPD event was designed to provide delegates with an interactive chance to meet the professionals first hand. Demonstrations included: Concrete Repairs, Carbon Fibre, Concrete Testing and Cathodic Protection and Monitoring Systems. Delegates were also given the opportunity to have a tour around The Vinci Technology Centre.

 

 

 

The Structural Concrete Alliance Roadshow in full swing

The next roadshow is being held in Chester on Tuesday 11th October, to book your place please click here

CRA updates Standard Method of Measurement for Concrete Repair

The Concrete Repair Association (CRA), one of the Associations that comprise the Structural Concrete Alliance, has released a new edition of its Standard Method of Measurement for Concrete Repair. The document, now in its third edition, has been fully revised to reflect new and current methods, practices and standards.

The Standard Method of Measurement for Concrete Repair aims to assist the origination of clearer Bills of Quantities for concrete repair work by providing a uniform basis for measuring concrete repair and for fully itemising all aspects of the work involved.

It provides notes on repair measurement and a specimen Bill of Quantities. The method of measurement includes detailed instructions for : General, Trials and Routine Testing; Surface Cleaning;  Survey; Repairs; Crack Repairs; Pore/Blow Hole Fillers; Levelling Mortars/Fairing Coats; Surface Coatings and Treatments;  and Resin Injection. It also itemises time-related elements such as provision of access and site facilities.

The Standard Method of Measurement has proved of enormous benefit to construction professionals since the first edition was published in 1990. Being one of the CRA’s most popular technical documents, thousands of copies have been downloaded from the CRA website or provided in hard copy format.

The new third edition of the document is available for free download from the CRA website, www.cra.org.uk.

CPA releases new cathodic protection guidance 

The Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA), one of the associations that comprise the Structural Concrete Alliance, has released two new guides to help newcomers to the industry and those with overall responsibility for structures to understand available cathodic protection (CP) systems and how they work.

Technical Note 11: Impressed Current Anodes for the Cathodic Protection of Atmospherically Exposed Reinforced Concrete summarises the anode systems currently commercially available in the UK, detailing the main features of each system including their installation, typical application and performance.

The document explains that impressed current cathodic protection is widely used to provide corrosion control on reinforced concrete structures suffering from reinforcement corrosion. It is also applied to early 20th-century steel framed masonry and brick clad buildings and monuments.

Aimed at ensuring that specifiers and asset managers with overall responsibility for structures understand the properties of the various anode systems available, the document categorises the anode systems available into six main types, namely: conductive organic coatings; thermal sprayed zinc; coated titanium expanded mesh/mesh ribbon in a concrete overlay; coated titanium expanded mesh ribbon – mortared into slots chased into the concrete or embedded in new construction; internal conductive ceramic titania or coated titanium (discrete) anodes; and conductive cementitious overlay containing nickel coated carbon fibres.

By detailing the main features of each type of system and explaining how each works, the extent of use and the expected life and cost of each, the document aims to enable asset owners and managers to make an informed choice about the type of system most appropriate for their structure. However, it stresses that anode selection should be made as part of the design process by a suitably qualified Cathodic Protection Engineer, who has Level 3 certification to BS EN 15257 in cathodic protection of steel in concrete or equivalent knowledge, training and experience.

The Association has also produced a useful glossary of terms. Technical Note 28: A is for Anode provides a brief overview of the technical terms used in cathodic protection of steel in concrete. The glossary is intended to help newcomers to cathodic protection to understand the terms which may be used during a project.

Both documents are available for free download from the Corrosion Prevention Association website. To see the full range of available CPA publications and Technical Notes visit: http://www.corrosionprevention.org.uk/publications.php

The Structural Concrete Alliance brings together the Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA), Concrete Repair Association (CRA) and Sprayed Concrete Association (SCA) to provide authoritative guidance on the repair, refurbishment and renovation of concrete; cathodic protection of steel and concrete structures; and sprayed concrete technology and application techniques.

For further information on guidance documents and training available from the Structural Concrete Alliance, and for details of its free regional CPD seminar programme, visit www.structuralconcretealliance.org.uk.

Structural Concrete Alliance holds its first Practical Demonstration Day

The Structural Concrete Alliance is to hold its first Practical Demonstration Day at The Vinci Technology Centre, Leighton Buzzard on Wednesday, 21 September 2016.

This free CPD event is designed to provide delegates with an opportunity to meet the professional’s first hand and witness interactive demonstrations of key repair, protection, strengthening and sprayed concrete techniques.

Following an initial welcome and introduction delegates will be divided into groups to visit four separate demonstration stations. Each station will feature live displays highlighting the key preparation, skills and techniques involved in: Concrete Repairs; Carbon Fibre Strengthening; Concrete Testing; and Cathodic Protection and Monitoring Systems.

Delegates will also be given an opportunity to discuss their queries with members of the Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA), Concrete Repair Association (CRA) and Sprayed Concrete Association (SCA) who will be exhibiting at the event.

A tour of the extensive test facilities at the Vinci Technology Centre will be available for interested delegates, while lunch and refreshments will be on offer within the Centre’s Crossrail area; an impressive full scale architectural model of a Crossrail station.

The day will begin with registration at 9am, and is scheduled to close at 3pm, with live demonstration sessions taking place throughout the morning and afternoon. To confirm your FREE place, please download and complete theBooking form and return to: emma.simmonds@agmhouse.com

The Structural Concrete Alliance brings together the Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA), Concrete Repair Association (CRA) and Sprayed Concrete Association (SCA) to provide authoritative guidance on the repair, refurbishment and renovation of concrete; cathodic protection of steel and concrete structures; and sprayed concrete technology and application techniques.

For further information on the Structural Concrete Alliance free regional CPD seminar programme and available guidance documents, contact the Structural Concrete Alliance offices on: 01420 471619; email:admin@structuralconcretealliance.org; or visithttp://www.structuralconcretealliance.org.

New guidance on concrete corrosion testing from the CPA

The Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA), one of the associations that comprise the Structural Concrete Alliance, has released a new guidance document which highlights

the most commonly used corrosion testing techniques for reinforced and pre-stressed concrete structures.

Explaining that corrosion is rarely an issue affecting the whole structure uniformly, Technical Note 27: Corrosion Testing of Concrete Structures aims to enable the user to better understand how to assess corrosion risk and therefore make informed decisions about repair strategy based upon a broad base of information.

The guide explains that the initial cause of corrosion is commonly the result of a number of interrelated variables:  changes in the concrete permeability, caused by local differences in composition, compaction and curing; construction errors leading to areas with low concrete cover to reinforcement; and variation in the exposure environment, leading to areas with elevated chloride ion content or high carbonation depth.

It states that the aim of comprehensive corrosion testing should be to understand the exposure variability, ascertain risk and develop a repair and maintenance strategy that provides the best technical and commercial solution for the structure.

The document explains that delamination and visual surveys; or global, open grid half cell potential surveys are the most commonly used methods of ascertaining risk but that these alone cannot determine the corrosion risk over the entire structure.

Noting that testing needs to be properly planned by competent professionals and tailored to the specific needs of each structure, the document states that the findings of the above surveys should be used to select or target representative locations for further testing.

Others tests may include detailed, closer grid half cell potential surveys; screening for chloride and other contamination; testing for depths of carbonation; corrosion rate monitoring; or concrete resistivity testing.

For each type of testing, the guide outlines typical methods, advantages and disadvantages and explains what the obtained results may mean.

The document is available for free download from the Corrosion Prevention Association website. To see the full range of available CPA publications and Technical Notes visit: http://www.corrosionprevention.org.uk/publications.php

The Structural Concrete Alliance brings together the Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA), Concrete Repair Association (CRA) and Sprayed Concrete Association (SCA) to provide authoritative guidance on the repair, refurbishment and renovation of concrete; cathodic protection of steel and concrete structures; and sprayed concrete technology and application techniques.

For further information on guidance documents and training available from the Structural Concrete Alliance, and for details of its free regional CPD seminar programme, visit www.structuralconcretealliance.org.uk.

 

The Concrete Repair Association’s new chairman Keith Barrow has outlined his plans for further developing the Association, detailing  a series of key objectives which aim to uphold the professionalism for which the Association and its members are recognised.

During his two-year tenure as Chairman, Keith plans to further develop the training available to members, ensuring their continued competence and advancing  their skills and expertise. He also hopes to improve the benefits and rewards of membership and encourage greater participation, particularly from smaller contractors.

Highlighting that the CRA is an established professional association within this specialist sector of construction, Keith explains that its strict entry requirements mean that membership provides businesses with a marker of credibility.

As well as being able to demonstrate a proven track record and overall proven ability, each full member is obliged to be QA accredited to ISO 9001, and to the environmental standard BS EN ISO 14001. Members must also comply with the Association’s stringent Codes of Practice and its training requirements. They must also display their commitment to maintaining high standards of health and safety performance, with many members having achieved accreditation to OHSAS 18001.

The CRA is also a valuable source of information regarding standards and good practice and produces numerous technical publications, including the newly updated Standard Method of Measurement.

“The Concrete Repair Association is a compass of competency and emblem of quality workmanship,” declares Keith.

“I hope to develop the Association into a stronger and more rewarding organisation for its current members by continuing to develop the membership services, support and benefits they receive.

“I also aim to demonstrate that membership is excellent value for money so that other professional companies within the sector will aspire to join.”

Keith, who is Director for Major Projects at Volkerlaser Ltd, was elected as Chairman of the CRA at its Annual General Meeting in Manchester on 16 October 2015. He has extensive experience of the industry and has been on the CRA Executive committee for some 10 years .

Having graduated in Civil Engineering, he worked as a Graduate Engineer with Amey before joining Balfour Beatty. He moved internally to Balvac Whitley Moran (now Balvac Ltd)  in 1990 and worked in various roles before becoming Director and General Manager in 2006. He joined Volkerlaser in 2009.

The CRA is a member of  Structural Concrete Alliance. This brings together the expertise of the CRA, Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA) and Sprayed Concrete Association (SCA) to provide a single coordinated voice for the asset protection and repair industry. It offers technical guidance, CPD presentations and regional seminars  aimed at improving understanding of concrete repair and refurbishment techniques.

 

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